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Foto eines Leuchtturms als Symbol der Orientierung
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Health education and health promotion are important aspects of the German public health service.

 
Explanatory notes on Guiding Concepts of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Glossary of concepts, strategies and methods in health promotion and Disease Prevention

Health promotion is a complex and interdisciplinary field of action. For a fruitful collaboration, all persons involved need to agree on shared technical terms, concepts and courses of action which overcome the thresholds of single professional disciplines. Without such shared understanding, misunderstandings are inevitable, and pursuing shared goals together is more difficult.

Hence, since 1993, the German Federal Centre for Health Education (German: Bundeszentrale für gesundheitliche Aufklärung) develops and publishes a glossary of health promotion and disease prevention keywords. The glossary contains explanations of core concepts in the field and provides an integrated overview of current scientific and political debates on the topic in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

A growing demand for - and interest in - sharing scientific and practical knowledge and experiences across the borders of countries and languages arises from the advancing globalization and the “digital revolution” with its new ways to communicate. The Federal Centre for Health Education aims to encourage and facilitate this exchange and to make the interpretation of strategies, methods and concepts in German-speaking countries visible and comprehensible.

 
 

Therefore, in an initial phase, we provide English translations for 20 (out of ca. 120) recently revised and updated keywords in the German glossary. The selected keywords are unique in their interpretation and usage in German-speaking countries; in contrast, keywords in the German glossary which originate from English-speaking countries and are being used in a similar fashion in Germany (e.g., “social marketing”) were not selected for translation into English. The editorial team* takes account for the identification and naming of the German keywords, for the recruitment of authors and for the selection of the English keywords.

The glossary targets scholars as well as practitioners who are interested in drawing comparisons with German-language countries and are looking for stimuli and suggestions for their work. It also provides students and lecturers in the health sciences with orientation and studying aids or planning aids.

* Members of the editorial team are: Alf Trojan, Lotte Kaba-Schönstein, Peter Franzkowiak, Guido Nöcker, and Stephan Blümel

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The following Guiding Concept is only selected randomly!


Health Promotion and Nursing Care

Doris Schaeffer

That health promotion also plays a major role in nursing is today taken as given in Germany. Nevertheless, for many years this thought was considered strange: According to the sequential approach to care (something that is still valid for large parts of the discourse on care), nursing stood squarely at the end of the healthcare process and was activated only when all other preventive, curative and rehabilitative possibilities had been exhausted, that is, when the task remaining was solely one of safekeeping and safeguarding. This understanding is also reflected in the existing legislation (the Long-Term Care Insurance Act, SGB XI). Although the basic principle propagated there is that prevention goes before care (and before rehabilitation), a forward-looking idea in light of the long-neglected possibilities prevention offers, nevertheless this law contains ideas concerning the basic tasks of care which are no longer considered valid in international nursing science. The simple principle of prevention going before care fails to emphasize the inherent prevention potentials contained within care, but rather points to those links in the healthcare chain that lie before nursing.

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Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA) / Maarweg 149-161 / 50825 Köln / Tel +49 221 8992-0 / Fax +49 221 8992-300 /
E-Mail:
poststelle(at)bzga.de / E-Mail for Orders: order(at)bzga.de

The Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA) is a specialist authority within the portfolio of the Federal Ministry of Health.